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Find Org Roam notes via their relations

Too long; didn't read

Are you an org-roam user that takes a lot of notes and struggles finding them? I will share here a function to reach lost notes via their relations.

The problem

I like to read. A lot. And for a while I struggled at remembering good quotes and concepts that I read in books. Things somewhat improved when I got my e-reader. I could easily annotate text and move my notes around. Then I started using org-roam. With it I could organize my notes and discover them easily via org-roam-find-file. And it went like that for a while, until... there were too many notes around!

My first adjustment was using org-roam-graph (long are gone the times when I could plot all of my notes with the default command). With that you can see notes as a navigable picture. The best situation to consult these graphs of notes is when your notes link to each other, because they will be closer to each other.

Anyway, give it enough time and the value of your notes will not be graphs but the links between different graphs. How can we explore them?

It is a problem indeed

Luckily I am not the only one having this issue! Somebody developed a nice visualization web application for your notes (a serious upgrade of org-roam-graph). Some other person has started ordering properly notes via smart database queries. And somebody else has started analyzing relations between notes with statistics tools!

I tried all of these, but again: I got too many notes now. And I want a simple and quick tool to follow my note relations. So I spent some time searching around with little success. Then I asked myself: how difficult would it be to bake my own little function?

And there is a solution

My ideal function follows org-roam notes relations as if they were files in a file system. If a note does not have links, I can only open it, otherwise I can both navigate its directly related notes or open it.

Well that is what I need in words. Let me show you what I got!

In the video I open my Tiramisu' recipe note. Then I follow its relations and I get to a new recipe. The relation I am using for this journey is "recipe". I use that as a linking note for my recipes.

The code for the function is below.

(defun my/navigate-note (arg &optional note choices)
  "Navigate notes by link. With universal ARG tries to use only to navigate the tags of the current note. Optionally takes a selected NOTE and filepaths CHOICES."
  (interactive "P")
  (let* ((choices (or
                   choices
                   (when arg (org-roam-db--links-with-max-distance (buffer-file-name) 1))))
         (all-notes (org-roam--get-title-path-completions))
         (completions
          (or (--filter (-contains-p choices (plist-get (cdr it) :path)) all-notes) all-notes))
         (title-with-tags (org-roam-completion--completing-read "File: " completions))
         (res (cdr (assoc title-with-tags completions)))
         (next-note (plist-get res :path)))
    (if (string= note next-note)
        (find-file note)
      (my/navigate-note nil next-note (org-roam-db--links-with-max-distance next-note 1)))))

A recursive function! The design is: gather all the notes you have, let the user pick one, gather the notes linked to that, let the user pick one, ..., if the user picks the same note twice, it means the user really wanted that: so open it.

There is a bit of noise in there due to translating file paths to note links, but roughly that's it. Note that if you are in a note and call the function with the C-u universal prefix, it reduces the initial scope to the links of the open note. That is useful if you want to skip a step when you know what you are looking for.

I thought about making something fancier than this, but then I thought: why bother? It works and I am the only user for now. Let me know if this gives problems to you.

Conclusion

From great powers come great responsibilities! Make the best out of your notes relations! After loading this function in your Emacs, please be fabulous by creating some incredible knowledge that makes us all better.

Happy discovering!

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